Meet The Graduates

All of these dogs have successfully completed one of our training camps. 

Rory

German Short Haired Pointer

Rory is a German Shorthaired Pointer from Roseville. Rory came to us for training at three years old and was quite sure that he ran his household. He ignored his owners when they asked him to do things unless they offered him a snack. During his walks, Rory had his own agenda. He spent his time on walks tugging his mom along to look for lizards, bugs, turkeys and anything else that moved. Rory also had an issue with eating things he was not supposed to. He had eaten the bottom of the sofa as well as a coffee table while he was left loose in the house. He also could not be trusted around any kind of food left within reach on counters or on tables.

We worked with Rory on his listening skills on and off leash and replaced his hunting behaviors with ones that involved a lot less leash pulling during walks. Since Rory had a history of chasing animals, we proofed his off-leash recall around wildlife and loose dogs to prevent him from running away. With proper supervision and maintenance of rules, Rory has his freedom back in the house. He  shows his parents that he is making good choices by choosing not to  jump up on counters and display destructive behavior.

Smoke

Cane Corso

Smoke is a 2-year-old Cane Corso from Wilton. He came to us with two of his housemates. He was great with people but was extremely aggressive with other animals. He even attacked a goat on his property and had hurt multiple stray cats. Since the family has lots of other types of animals on their property, this aggressive behavior was especially concerning. Smoke also had an issue with Reaper, who he had grown up with. As puppies, Reaper used to chase Smoke a lot. One time the two got into a fight over food. After that point, they have not gotten along. The owner’s have had to keep the dogs in separate enclosures since then.
We quickly realized that the relationship between Smoke and Reaper was not going to be salvageable and attempting to force the two dogs to get along would have been dangerous for both the dogs and their family. Smoke learned a full program of on and off leash obedience and recalls were proofed around dogs and wildlife. We did a lot of training around farm animals, using a fence to keep everyone safe. He also learned to keep calm and ignore the animals with supervision.
His family can now play off leash in the field on their property without the dogs taking off to go look for the other animals or run to another dog’s enclosure to try to attack them. His family is enjoying him more and getting to spend some quality time with him and his housemates on leash around the chickens and rabbits, as well as using the place command to sit outside with them for a cup of coffee. By the end of camp Smoke and Reaper were able to walk past each other on leash with no posturing or lunging and the fence fighting had stopped. Their training will always need maintenance, but their family now has an effective management protocol in place to make their lives easier and safer.

Lexi

Dogo Argentino

Lexi is a 9-month old Dogo Argentino from Elk Grove. Since Lexi is a large dog her owners made the responsible choice to have her trained so that she can be a trustworthy member of society. Lexi had selective hearing and pulled on the leash on walks. She is youngest dog in the house, so she was often a pest to her two older housemates and would bug them to the point of starting scuffles. Lexi would rush the fence in the backyard with a fit of barking whenever she heard the neighbors moving around and rushed the front door barking if guests came over.

 

We taught Lexi to walk nicely on leash and how to heel at her owner’s side during walks instead of smelling everything and looking for other dogs and people. Lexi learned a place command to prevent her from bothering the other dogs and from charging at the door whenever guests came over. Lexi learned an off leash recall that will allow her owners to call her away from the fence whenever she hears a neighbor, and will also allow her additional freedom to play at the nearby park! Her family is looking forward to taking her hunting using her new off leash skills!

Sadie

Cattle Dog Mix

Sadie is a fun young cattle dog mix from Marysville! Sadie came to us for basic obedience and general house manners such as jumping, counter surfing, etc. Sadie would also occasionally bark at other dogs on walks. She would also pull on the leash.

 

While in training, we were strict on criteria for leash walking and set the expectations from the start. We taught Sadie to stay next to her handler’s left leg in heel position while on walks. With these new stricter rules, we saw a change in Sadie’s behavior, and she stopped barking at other dogs. Sadie loves to play ball which was extremely useful in practicing her off leash recalls. We taught Sadie the place command and to stay on her place bed until released. This will help the family when guests are coming in and out, and when they are trying to eat dinner.

 

Sadie’s commands are all rock solid and her owners have a great understanding of how to use them! She has done great!

Reaper

Doberman Pinscher

Reaper is a 2-year-old Doberman Pinscher from Wilton. He came to us with two of his housemates. He was aggressive towards other dogs and very territorial, but well behaved around people. When it came to being off leash, Reaper would run away. The family also has animals including chickens, cats, rabbits, and goats, but Reaper was never allowed to interact with them because his owners feared he would hurt them. Reaper and his housemates Smoke and Anubis grew up together. However, Reaper would chase poor Smoke…and then a fight broke out. Since then, the two have not gotten along. The owners did the right thing and used two separate enclosures to keep the dogs apart, but every chance they got they would try to attack each other.

 

We quickly realized that the relationship between Smoke and Reaper was not going to be salvageable and attempting to force the two dogs to get along would have been dangerous for both the dogs and their family. Reaper learned a full program of on and off leash obedience and recalls were proofed around dogs and wildlife. We did a lot of training around farm animals, using a fence to keep everyone safe. He also learned to keep calm and ignore the animals with supervision.

 

His family can now play off leash in the field on their property without the dogs taking off to go look for the other animals or run to another dog’s enclosure to try to attack them. His family is enjoying him more and getting to spend some quality time with him and his housemates on leash around the chickens and rabbits, as well as using the place command to sit outside with them for a cup of coffee. By the end of camp Smoke and Reaper were able to walk past each other on leash with no posturing or lunging and the fence fighting had stopped. Their training will always need maintenance, but their family now has an effective management protocol in place to make their lives easier and safer.

Colt

Yellow Labrador

Colt is a Yellow Labrador from Elk Grove. When Colt came to us, he was completely out of control with excitement. He would jump as high as your head to cover you in wet sloppy kisses the moment he met you while slamming his 80 pound body into you. He pulled on his leash and dug his feet in to drag his owners up to every person and dog that he saw. If there were no people or dogs around, he would drag them to smell everything that he possibly could. Since Colt had a hard time being still, he would find things to do that were not so great, like barking, digging, chewing, and playing keep away with anything he could get his mouth on. Colt had a hard time going anywhere or being around any humans or other dogs without exploding with enthusiasm.

We started training by introducing Colt to a system of communication through basic obedience commands. After that, we asked him to perform commands in increasingly more distracting environments. We took many trips out into public in order to help him get used to going out and about calmly and not greeting every single person in stores and parks with kisses and jumps. We then taught Colt to walk nicely on a leash in heel position and to leave enticing smells when asked. We did a lot of long sit and down stays off leash with other dogs moving around so that Colt learned to relax and not dive into the action. We used a place command in the house in order to prevent Colt from continuing to chew and run away with everything that he could pick up.

His family is now able to enjoy walks with him and is looking forward to trying out hunting next season!

Vinnie

Cane Corso

Vinnie is a young Cane Corso from Citrus Heights with a sweet and friendly temperament but really did not understand his own size! He loved to jump up on his guests to greet them. Due to his size this presented a problem…and he still had some growing to do!

 

Vinnie’s training consisted of helping him learn that not every single person he saw needed to show him attention. We taught him the place command so that he would stay on his place instead of greeting visitors by jumping on them. We also worked with Vinnie on off leash training with the use of an e-collar. All behaviors taught with an e-collar were originally taught by food luring. Then we overlayed lures with leash pressure, and then leash pressure to e-collar pressure. Vinnie was a great student and did well with training!

Anubis

German Shepherd

Anubis is a 2-year-old German Shepherd from Wilton. He came to us with two of his housemates. He was aggressive towards dogs he did not know, and to other animals. He was very hyperactive and territorial. He lacked the proper socialization needed in order to feel confident with other animals.
Anubis learned a full program of on and off leash obedience and recalls were proofed around dogs and wildlife. We did a lot of training around farm animals, using a fence to keep everyone safe. He also learned to keep calm and ignore the animals with supervision.
His family can now play off leash in the field on their property without the dogs taking off to go look for the other animals or run to another dog’s enclosure to try to attack them. His family is enjoying him more and getting to spend some quality time with him and his housemates on leash around the chickens and rabbits, as well as using the place command to sit outside with them for a cup of coffee. Their training will always need maintenance, but their family now has an effective management protocol in place to make their lives easier and safer.

Max

Toy Poodle

Max is a 9-month old Toy Poodle from Roseville with a big attitude! Max had a ton of energy and was quite sure that he ran his household. When Max did not want to do something, he would act out by latching onto his owner’s hands. We were able to witness this behavior firsthand during his pickup. The owners were trying to recall Max to them, and he was latching onto their hands. Once they offered him a piece of bacon, they were able to finally grab him. What we saw explained his biggest problem. They were trying their hardest just to be able to grab their dog just so that they could get him, but they would bribe him with food. This bribe was more of a reward to Max for the behavior, which in turn caused him to lash out even more.

When Max came to training, we knew it would be a while until he showed us his true colors. His first few days in a new environment, he was a perfect A+ student! Once he became more comfortable with us, we started seeing the issues. Little Max thought he ran the world. What we had to do was show Max that his actions do not affect us. When he would try to bite for simple things like putting on his leash, loading him into the van, we would not react. Since we stopped reacting to his negative behavior, he would stop trying to bite because he knew it would not get a reaction or a reward. After that we started making Max’s life much more controlled. At home, Max would do whatever he wanted whenever he wanted it, and this included pottying in the house constantly. We taught Max the place command to stay on his bed, and to stay until released. This way his owners know where he is and do not have to constantly worry about what he’s doing. Once Max starts proving himself, he can be allowed more freedom! Since training, Max has been great on walks, recalls off leash, and has improved his attitude at home!

Clark

German Shepherd Mix

Clark is a 2-year-old German Shepherd mix from Sacramento who came to us with severe reactivity. His reactivity was primarily to dogs but also to small animals and anything that moves such as trees, long grass, etc. Clark’s owner noticed his reactivity began after they moved into an apartment.
Clark had to be leash walked at home constantly and had almost no areas for physical exercise and/or mental stimulation. We think this, as well as the general environment of an apartment complex led Clark to decide that his job was to scare things away while on his walks. People walking other dogs would hear him react and immediately leave the area which made him feel strong and important. He also had a habit of redirecting on his owner, and therefore had to be walked with a muzzle on.
We began Clark’s training with teaching him how to properly walk on leash. We taught him the correct heel positioning and how to be more aware of his handler. After that, Clark’s exposure to other dogs was VERY controlled since he was not yet trustworthy if a dog were to walk by us.

Controlling his environment made it much easier to help him understand that reacting will not make the other dog go away. Once he saw the other dog was not going to leave, he calmed down very quickly. From that point we added more and more distractions as he got more comfortable. After training with Clark, we believe that his reactivity stemmed from a lack of purpose.
We suspected Clark’s transition back home could be challenging for him since that was the place he was most reactive. We spoke to the owner about how to maintain his training to be successful not just for a few days post training but to have years of success. In addition we prepared them for the reality that reactivity cases are not straight forward and assured them that we are here for follow up calls and lessons when needed. After a follow up with Clark’s owner, we learned that Clark’s reactivity to other animals is gone! Although his dog reactivity still needs management, he is vastly different and is continuing to improve every day!

dog

breed

dog

breed

dod

breed

dog

breed

dog

breed

dod

breed

dog

breed

dog

breed

dod

breed

dog

breed

dog

breed